17 September 2004

Brazil Gets Ready to Add Ethanol to Japan’s Car Tanks

Japan is conducting advanced research on the addition of ethanol to the fuel used by its vehicle fleet and is interested in the alcohol produced in Brazil.

This information was furnished by the Governor of São Paulo, Geraldo Alckmin, following his meeting with the Prime Minister of Japan, Junichiro Koizumi.

“Japanese interest in ethanol and our technology is well along. We are the world’s biggest producer of sugar cane,” the governor remarked.

According to him, Japan is studying the possibility of a gasoline mixture containing 3% of alcohol.

“Japan signed the Kyoto Protocol and has a great interest in sustained development and environmental preservation, and alcohol is a clean, green, non-polluting energy source,” he explained.

According to the governor, the Japanese have two major concerns regarding alcohol: price and supply. Alckmin said that Brazil’s refineries are already preparing to meet these demands.

“The refineries are joining to put together a structure capable of forming a partnership with Japan and guarantee price and supply. We have the capacity to guarantee this supply,” Alckmin observed.

This is the Japanese Prime Minister’s first trip to Brazil. Koizumi is heading a group of entrepreneurs and government officials here to discuss business and set up exchanges in the areas of energy and environment.

He is also making contacts with the Japanese-Brazilian community to prepare for the commemoration of the first centennial of Japanese immigration to Brazil.

The Premier and his entourage visited farms and sugar cane plantations in the interior of the state, institutions and historical landmarks associated with São Paulo’s Japanese Brazilian community, and the Tietê River, which is the object of a depollution program financed by the Japanese government.

Brazil possesses the world’s largest Japanese community outside Japan.

Source: Brazzil.com vom 2004-09-16.

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